{JennylaFleur: Millinery}

late 18th century hat

THE FROSTING HAT
late 18th century hat

Hat Base:
13" straw hat blank

Fabric/Materials:
size 18 millinery wire, silk taffeta, lace, vintage velvet ribbon, ostrich feathers

Synopsis:
Completed February 2009

 

 

Synopsis:

*sigh* I love making hats. They offer fun and bringing a bit of fantesy to a costume. I was inspired by the current craze amoung my friends for what we have dubbed "Polonaiseville" and a darling hat pictured at Vaux a few years ago. I am enchated by this over-the top tilted hat. It's a style frequently in engravings in the mid-late 1770s, becoming more tilted and feathered as the hair gets higher. So I will have to sort out "pouf" hairstyle for what I'm calling my Frosting Hat.

 

The Results:

April 2011
At Costume Con 29.
More photos from this event can be found here.

{photo courtesy
of Katherine}

 

 

 {photo courtesy
of Katherine}

 

April 2010
Tea at Hill & Dale Farm.
More photos from this event can be found here.

{photo courtesy
of Kendra}

{photo courtesy
of Loren}

{photo courtesy
of Loren}

 

 

April 2010
Tea at Hill & Dale Farm.
More photos from this event can be found here.

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Dress Diary:

February 2009

     

*sigh* I love making hats. They offer fun and bringing a bit of fantesy to a costume. I was inspired by the current craze amoung my friends for what we have dubbed "Polonaiseville"and a darling hat pictured at Vaux a few years ago. I am enchated by this over-the top tilted hat. It's a style frequently in engravings in the mid-late 1770s, becoming more tilted and feathered as the hair gets higher. So I will have to sort out "pouf" hairstyle for what I'm calling my Frosting Hat.

     

The Frosting Hat began it's journey as a plain straw hat, bought a few years ago at an 18th century market fair at Mount Vernon. I zig-zagged size 18 millinery wire along the edge of and a couple of inches inside the underside brim. (I later covered the wire with coral velvet ribbon).

     

I pulled out my favorite wide lace (thank you LA garment district) and after starching it with a spray starch, I pleated it onto the brim. I pleated, pressed and pinned right onto the straw. A little steam never hurt a straw brim.

 

     

Once the lace was stitched down, I started pleating a length of baby pink silk taffeta. I just eyeballed the pleats, pressing each one to set it. I marked a line about 1.25" from the bottom and eased the fabric onto the hat, lining up my marked line with the base of the crown.

 

 

       

Once that was basted on the hat, I ran a gathering stitch along the top of the silk and gathered it to from a pouf. I stuffed the pouf with a bit of netting (so it wouldn't collapse on itslf over time) and covered the hole with a self fabric covered button.

 

How to keep the darn thing on! I orginally tried just one tie but it needed a second top one for more security. I think some high hair and a hat pin will also be required if it's at all windy.

Is it too much? *wicked grin*

 

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